Godzilla’s Revenge: A Misunderstood Movie for Those With Enlarged IQ, Only Serious Brainiacs Need Apply

By Kyle B. Stiff

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Here’s a quick rundown on what may be the best Godzilla move of all time. It’s about a little boy who goes to Monster Island and meets Godzilla’s goofy-looking son, a creature with a battle cry that sounds like a donkey. They become friends while stock footage taken from other (better?) monster movies plays in the background. Most kaiju fans don’t take this one serious because it *seems* lighthearted, even silly. But, behold: Godzilla’s Revenge (also called All Monsters Attack) is the darkest Godzilla movie of them all.

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The movie opens with shots of an industrial wasteland.

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This is the urban jungle that formed Ichiro, our protagonist, a little boy growing up among steel girders and desolate parking lots with two parents constantly working and only a television to keep him company during dinner.

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We know right off the bat that Ichiro is not a cool kid as he explains to his little lady friend the sound that his imaginary monster friend makes. She is saved from his autistic cringe when a gang of bullies show up to assert dominance.

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This is life for Ichiro – being bullied in an urban hellscape with no one to protect him. It’s the opposite of the kaiju formula, where monsters who were made for endless war beat the shit out of each other throughout all eternity. Ichiro’s life is just a sad blip on the radar.

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The fact that Ichiro doesn’t wallow in sadness only makes his sad fate more apparent to the adult viewer (and more palatable to young viewers who just wanted to see some giant monsters fight each other).

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When Ichiro is alone, he dreams of being on Monster Island. He imagines that he is friends with Godzilla’s son, Minya (or Minilla), a sort of cute creature with a face that is nonetheless nightmare fuel. Minya is just as pathetic as Ichiro, though he puts on a brave face, simply stating that he has no friends so that there can be no confusion about his state. This may be more the result of Ichiro’s latent autism, in which his emotional disconnect with himself manifests in imaginary friends stating matter-of-factly that they are alone and without friends but not making a big deal of it.

 

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Minya is bullied by a monster called Gabara, a giant lizard with a cat’s head and wild orange hair. Gabara looks stupid and thus he’s a real shit, just the sort of thing that would be dreamed up by a young boy sorting through his own problems.

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In fact, it’s important to note that even though Ichiro retreats into a fantasy world to get away from life’s difficulties, I think it’s a psychologically healthy fantasy world. It doesn’t cater to his desires but presents him with the hard truths about life in a way that a young boy can understand. He doesn’t daydream about a world where everyone is nice to each other and nothing can hurt him. He knows that’s impossible. He knows the world favors the strong, and he wants to be strong, even though he’s scared.

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In his fantasy world, Godzilla doesn’t cut Minya any slack. One might make the mistake of thinking that being the son of the most powerful monster would guarantee you an easy life, but Godzilla didn’t become the most powerful by being soft. Godzilla doesn’t have time for Minya’s tears, and when Minya desperately seeks his help against his bully, his father pushes him back toward Gabara. On Monster Island, there is no room for weakness! In fact, I think the title All Monsters Attack isn’t necessarily an order, but a statement that this is what monsters do: They attack. We do the same. It’s how we survive!

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The funny thing is that once Minya gives the fight everything he has, Godzilla actually does help him when things get really hairy. When Minya embarrasses Gabara and Gabara loses his cool, Godzilla comes in, throws Gabara around, whips him with his tail, beats his face in, squats and shits on him, you name it. There’s a life lesson in there: No one will help you until you help yourself. Problems seem insurmountable but you still have to give it some effort, but once you do, help will arrive.

Or it won’t, and you’ll die.

Either way, it’s better than living in fear like a coward!

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In the end, Ichiro’s fantasies about Godzilla and Minya and the Monster Island lifestyle inspire him to fight to survive a pretty harrowing real-life situation in which some bank robbers kidnap him and even consider killing him. It’s a rough situation, no doubt traumatizing for someone as sensitive as Ichiro. It’s a grim reminder of the world he lives in, a mean urban toilet bowl where a grown man will pull a knife on you if you get between him and a bag of money. But in surviving, Ichiro gains perspective. When his bullies try to torment him the next day, he doesn’t even consider backing down. He already knows true pain, so he has nothing to fear, even against opponents bigger than him. He fights! He even beats the alpha who leads the bullies!

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But here’s the thing. When Ichiro wins the fight, does he force the bullies to give up their cruel ways? Does he make them slink off in shame so they can contemplate their misdeeds? Hell no – he becomes their leader!

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And his first act is to terrorize a painter working on an advertising billboard. The man falls over, covered in paint, and as Ichiro and his crew laugh at the man’s plight and run away, it is simply a continuation of the will to survive and fight and persist in a cruel world. Such is life on Monster Island, also known as planet Earth!

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It’s this point that deeply troubles many viewers, especially some guy on YouTube that spazzed out about this movie. The guy on YouTube said this movie’s morals are indefensible, that this movie is horrendous because it depicts kids saying hell and damn, and he hates the idea of bullied kids turning into bullies themselves. He thinks it’s an awful movie for kids to watch. I’m sure he’s one of those guys who thinks that children should only watch pleasant things, and should be taught that kindness means everything, and that discomfort must be avoided at all costs.

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Does that sound nice? It shouldn’t – those are the values that turn people into livestock! Life is cruel and the suffering only ends with death (and maybe not even then). Avoiding pain doesn’t lead to pleasure, but to weakness and further suffering. Once we grasp that simple fact, what better lesson could a parent give than to teach their children how to fight and survive, even if it means hurting them?

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Hello, Illuminati! Can I Please Watch a Godzilla Movie Without Your Dumb Ideas in It? Thank You!

By Kyle B. Stiff

“Sure would be nice to watch a movie that isn’t full of Illuminati symbolism!” This is what I said to myself when I rented Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Considering the fact that it’s a big budget Hollywood movie made in an era when the war of ideas is just a few false flag attacks away from turning into an actual civil war, I should have known I wouldn’t be able to retreat into fantasy without the elites giving the ol’ “let’s indoctrinate Kyle” idea at least one more try.

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Even though the unnameable “powers that be” seem to be losing their grip on the world, let’s go through their latest pet project in the interest of keeping tabs on them, shall we? Also, please note that I will be referring to them as the “Illuminati” just because it’s a popular term. They don’t really call themselves that, of course. Also please keep in mind that despite dozens of other blog pieces about this very same thing, the LAST thing I want to be doing is documenting still more Illuminati influence in popular culture. These people are self-important degenerates, their ideas are stale and don’t work in the real world, at this point even low IQ normies are starting to catch on to this demon-worshipping blackmail cult, and truth be told I’m sick of them and sick of noticing how they ruin what could be great projects. There are a lot of awesome fight scenes in Godzilla: King of the Monsters, and some interesting takes on the various monsters, plus I fell in love with Mothra, so there’s hope for Hollywood yet. That is, there’s hope as long as the Illuminati keep losing ground. I’m looking forward to an age when we won’t have to deal with these weird freakshows trying to influence every single movie and music video!

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In older Godzilla movies, Godzilla often fought monsters who really had it in for us. So even though nobody in the movies really liked Godzilla, protagonists were forced to accept that at least he could occasionally defend us from worse monsters. Times being what they are, when evil is good but stupid is even better, Godzilla: King of the Monsters is full of characters who worship Godzilla (or other monsters) and want humanity to be wiped out, or at least drastically reduced in number. And I’m not just talking about the bad guys!

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Population reduction is a huge tip-off that this is an Illuminati production, as that’s become one of their core ideals. If you’ve ever wondered why so many stories seem to revolve around “humans bad, nature good,” it’s because the religion of the Illuminati is based on hatred toward humans. Their upbringing includes some pretty intense abuse, so their hatred of humans may be understandable. They’re obsessed with the idea that human beings are a “virus” and that the earth is sick of us. Once you spot this philosophy in movies, you’ll start noticing it more and more often. If you’re not the kind of person who is easily indoctrinated, it can be really annoying seeing such a dumb idea pushed as if it’s common sense!

In fact, if you’re shaking your head as you read this, and you’re thinking, “Oh my God we MUST reduce human population!” then congratulations! Your bitchass has been indoctrinated!

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The Asian lady on the science team helps frame this idea from a mythological perspective: In western civilization, we slay dragons, but in eastern civilization, they worship them. The idea is framed in such a way that we are struck by the wisdom of the Orient, and feel a knee-jerk response of “aw shucks, we always got it all backwards!” Thing is, we don’t have it backwards, as an entire planet full of failed states once looked to the West for inspiration regarding ideas that help nations thrive. Ideologically speaking, dragons, and in fact all monsters, must be slain in service to humanity. This scene, in which our main protagonist finds out that the Asian lady on his team is a monster-worshipping nutjob, should have been creepy and disconcerting. The fact that she outs herself as an indoctrinated psychopath and nobody throws her off the ship tells us a lot about the kind of people putting this movie together.

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Now that I think about it, there was not just one monster-worshipping Asian in this movie, but two. Doctor Serizawa was a lizard-worshipping weirdo who wanted to die for the entire duration of the film. Like a man-made messiah he had a look of stoic resignation, no doubt horrified by so many years of being forced to live alongside “awful” humans when all he wanted to do was die in service to Godzilla. While watching the awkward scene in which he was finally able to sacrifice himself so that Godzilla could live, I could hear the emotional intensity of the music, so I understood that I was supposed to care, but I didn’t. This guy was a middle-aged doctor, so I’m assuming he taught at a university and had spent decades making kids feel guilty for being human. I used to deal with guys like him in the philosophy department all the time. It’s like, okay Guy, I get it, Communism didn’t work out – now you either need to get over it or hang yourself, and put us both out of your misery!

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Doctor Serizawa says, “Godzilla is the key to coexistence being possible.” In terms of the movie’s story, he says this because he believes that Godzilla can keep all the other monsters in check. But in terms of the Illuminati turning this movie into one of their brain-washing projects, I can’t help but think that this has to do with the weird “diversity” programming that these cultists are obsessed with. They can’t just let nations exist as they are, and let each ethnic group interact (or not interact) however they want. It bothers them to no end. Since these Illuminati cultists worship reptilians (among other weird shit), I think this idea of Godzilla being the key to coexistence is about the gods or spirits that the Illuminati worship as the key to human coexistence. This is completely wrong, of course, because we know from history that every pagan god demands human sacrifice at some point, and pagan societies are no more peaceful than any other. But, still, it’s interesting to see them play their hand concerning their reptilian-enforced diversity religion. Nobody wants diversity except these weirdos who live in gated communities, in fact diversity inevitably leads to conflict, but still, the Illuminati’s reptilian demon-gods demand it, thus “diversity is our strength” I guess!

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The name of the science team our protagonist joins is called Monarch. This is a reference to a type of MK ULTRA mind control programming. It’s blatant. If you don’t see it, or somehow haven’t noticed this in a billion movies and music videos, then don’t worry about it – you never will! I’ve been seeing this stuff for decades; it’s obvious that these people are proud of their ability to turn a human being into a mind-controlled automaton. Which is funny, when you think about it, because there are limitless ways to ruin a person’s mind and turn them into a shadow of what they could have been, but it’s incredibly difficult to turn a person into the highest and best version of themselves. In fact, we don’t even know of one sure-fire method of doing the latter. So why oh WHY are these weirdos who so desperately want to control us so freaking obsessed with their ability to ruin a human being by turning them into a “useful idiot”?

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One scene shows a recording of a happy family having fun while dressed up as bears. This is going to be a stretch, but there’s a wild theory that Bill Cooper of Behold a Pale Horse fame was not just a conspiracy theorist, but the descendant of some kind of noble family line important to the Illuminati; the person pushing this theory happened to notice that Bill Cooper throws around an inordinate amount of “bear” references in the introduction to Behold a Pale Horse, as well as a few other things. It’s an interesting theory, but ultimately, who cares? The era of conspiracy theory in which we had to decode Illuminati symbolism in order to figure them out and track their movements is at an end. We already know what they believe in, and besides, they’ve become blatant in their broadcasting. Now we just keep tabs on them. These people have contributed shockingly little to the human story, and nobody cares about Illuminati bloodlines except for indoctrinated Illuminati cultists. So there’s no need to dwell on the bear symbolism; let’s just note that it’s there and move on.

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However, it is interesting to note that the mother in that happy scene later became a dried-up, unhappy, career-oriented woman who not only destroyed her own family, but also wanted to destroy the entire world by joining a bunch of lefty eco-terrorists. It’s a surprisingly based take on the failed mother archetype when, taken together with all the other Illuminati ideals, you’d think she would be the star and savior of humanity! In the end, she did end up sacrificing herself (the Illuminati obsession with mimicking the Christ mythos) and even said, “Hail the king” (or something like that). Is this an admission that feminazi ideals serve the reptilian overlords?

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There’s an occasional glimpse of Christian symbolism that juxtaposes oddly with the Illuminati reptilian-worship diversity-cult symbolism. When King Ghidorah ascends to the “throne” of a volcano and roars in triumph, a Christian cross is shown in the city below. It’s prominent enough to let the viewer know that King Ghidorah stands opposed to the Christian ideals of the common man. This shot would make perfect sense if Hollywood wasn’t controlled by dual-citizenship types who hate the country they live in and despise Christian values, so I’m not quite sure what it’s doing in an Illuminati movie like this one. Maybe it’s just a statement that the reptilians stand opposed to the creator of the universe beloved by much of mankind?

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There’s also a bit of Christian symbolism when Godzilla falls to the earth. This is a direct reference to the Book of Revelation, when Michael casts the dragon, or Satan, out of heaven with a third of his angels. They fall to the earth like falling stars. Of course, both King Ghidorah and Godzilla are stand-ins for reptilians, so this may be indicative of reptilian in-fighting rather than an assertion that King Ghidorah is some kind of angel. Ultimately, they’re all demons.

In fact, the 2014 Godzilla movie made it clear that the monsters were demons. There was no Illuminati symbolism in that movie (at least, none that I could see, and these people are usually pretty blatant about this stuff). Seeing the monsters fight in the 2014 Godzilla movie was like watching demons locked in eternal combat in hell, a nightmarish glimpse of burning black pits where no human would ever want to go. It was intense and made the soldiers’ HALO jump that much more heroic.

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There’s another piece of symbolism that makes me wonder if maybe the creators of this film are not one hundred percent on board with the failing Illuminati agenda. It’s subtle, but it’s there. Right before the final battle, there’s a burst of wind, and it causes an American flag to stand at attention. God is often symbolized as wind, as He gives the “breath of life” to living things. Instead of the Illuminati asserting that nation-states are stupid and outdated, as they tend to constantly remind us, here we see a symbol of America being reawakened by the breath of God. Is this an admission that the Illuminati know they’re in trouble?

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Actually, it could be a strong indicator that much of this movie is the product of an oracle who isn’t necessarily loyal to Christian or Illuminati ideals. I think lots of creative types are oracles. I see this in my own stories, where a supposedly simple “good guys versus bad monsters” story will end up having unexpected prophetic bits in it. This happens in fiction fairly often. It’s not that these stories can predict the future and help us avoid bad outcomes, they’re just snapshots of an aether full of swirling images projected from a higher realm that we can’t really understand. It’s been said by people wiser than me: The creative mind is something we don’t understand, and yet everything we have comes from creativity.

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Anyway, I’ll close with a palette cleanser. Mothra stole the show. I think I love her! She’s beautiful and graceful, and has a “heavenly” presence that made me choke up a little bit. What a shocking contrast with the aura of infernal rage of the other monsters! She’s a bad biddy and can’t be manipulated by King Ghidorah’s “fake alpha” call that tricks the other monsters. She’s noticeably smaller than the other monsters, too, and delicate, but she’s got plenty of tricks and sass that she uses in battle, and (SPOILER) she even sticks by her man to the bitter end – a rare quality in this era of abandoned families and societal breakdown!

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I vaguely remember seeing Mothra in the Godzilla movies of my youth, but I was never that into her. I always liked the BDSM Hellraiser-tier monsters like Gigan. But now that I’m older and my T-levels are dropping, I can’t get over that cutie Mothra! As my sanity weakens and I continue rambling on about reptilians and the Illuminati, I’ll probably snap and start dressing like one of the girls who used to sing to Mothra and summon her in the older movies. You’ll be able to find me at random bus stops in my colorful attire, singing and dancing as I desperately try to summon a giant moth who can save us all.

 

Godzilla Is Jehova, the Old Testament Kaiju Demon-God

I loved Shin Godzilla because it broke me down psychologically and forced me to reexamine everything I ever believed was true. You see, the lesson of Shin Godzilla is that the best representative of the human spirit is… bureaucracy?!?!

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This seemingly crazy assertion isn’t that much of a stretch. The movie jumps from one bureaucratic agency to another, in effect telling the story of Godzilla’s rampage from the perspective of government employees who have to deal with the chaos. I’ve never seen a movie told from this perspective; it’s some Criterion-level experimental film-making. Any other movie would have followed one bureaucrat, even going so far as to show him or her with their mate, their kids, dealing with the hassles of life, thus forcing the viewer to acknowledge that yes, indeed, this person is a human being – I’d better empathize with them.

But Shin Godzilla races from suit to suit, never really caring if the viewer has a chance to pick out their favorite bureaucrat. The characters aren’t shown as humans first and bureaucrats second, but as bureaucrats first and foremost who happen to have human responses to the situations they’re thrown into.

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I remember in one of the older Evangelion movies, someone said that humanity was the “eighteenth angel”, or that the collective sum of us was a godlike being. Shin Godzilla has a similar lesson, with the spirit of humanity shown as a meta-organism, with bureaucratic organizations as limbs of the meta-organism. Humanity’s strength doesn’t come from the individual, but instead, humanity dominates the planet because each individual can cooperate on a level that no other animal can compete with (except maybe Godzilla). In the older Godzilla movies, they would show military guys tossing out a few missiles, then the camera would zoom in on their horror-stricken faces as Godzilla would take a missile in the ass and not even notice. Then Godzilla would wail on some other monster, get winded, then leave on his own, and the credits would roll while some kids with Stockholm Syndrome would cheer and thank Godzilla for all his help. But in this movie, Godzilla really does face his most dangerous opponent… Godzilla vs. The Human Species.

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Shin Godzilla is a morality tale, a lesson for humanity. I’m not sure when exactly the idea of the “individual” was born historically (maybe the Renaissance?), but Shin Godzilla is an alarm, and it’s warning us that it may be time to prune the tree of individuality. Maybe the human meta-organism starts to look foolish if too many limbs start to mimic one another in a strange caricature of individuality. Just think of all the hardcore “rebels” out there, all fighting “the Man”, all wearing the same edgy clothes and listening to the same music. Unless someone is an artist, or an intellectual, or a wizard, or a diehard eccentric, then maybe it’s better to find a good spot to sit within the bureaucracy and then simply tend to the species in whatever way best suits the temperament of the “individual”. We are certainly in an age when people are getting more entrenched in their respective ideological or ethnic camps, after all.

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As a dude who’s always been a hardcore individual – and I say that without pride, as it has its downside – Shin Godzilla was a powerful psychedelic brew designed to destroy all my childish ideas about how the world works. It’s like when Paul Muad’dib took the Water of Life; before Shin Godzilla, all I saw was darkness, but now I see the big screaming lizard within, praise praise praise his name!

Which brings me to my Godzilla as God point. Before Shin Godzilla, there was an American-made Godzilla film back in 2014. It had a lot of beautiful shots, and there was an unforgettable sequence where some military guys jumped out of a plane and fell through a dark, dusty, burning hellzone while a bunch of giant demons were fighting one another. So good.

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But it also made the mistake that a lot of Godzilla movies make; actors with hefty price tags demanded a lot of screen time, which meant we spent too much time learning about so-and-so’s baby mama drama, which is hard to engage with when you really just want to see a giant monster squat and take a shit on a city in flames.

However, this was the film that gave me the idea that Godzilla truly is God, or at least, the Judeo-Christian-Islamic god-being. If enough people believe in a thing, and meditate on it and speak to it and sing to it, the thoughtform must become real out there in “the internet of spirits” or the world of abstractions or the astral plane… or whatever you want to call a higher realm that affects human behavior, but can’t necessarily be seen or measured. Just think of all those humans circling around the black cube of the Kaaba, or gently smooching the Wailing Wall, or twitchin’ and flailin’ in one of those American megachurches. All of that human intention goes somewhere, and if it’s not being eaten by a hyperdimensional being beyond our comprehension, then it’s surely creating such a being. Either way, it exists!

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So when I was watching the American version of Godzilla, and seeing his raw power, the pure reptilian hatred turned up to one thousand, and fifteen 9-11s happening every minute or so, I couldn’t help but think that GODzilla must surely be a stand-in for that ancient idea (or thought-form) that we’ve been feeding for thousands of years, and which in turn controls our behavior and, many times, ends up destroying or mutilating people beyond recognition. There are surely other such beings. Sports would be a powerful god-being for Godzilla to meet in a “versus” setting. Any political -ism would also surely have its own kaiju equivalent.

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It’s also interesting that Godzilla has represented different things at different times as we transition through the human story we’re in. In the first movie he was like a force of nature punishing humans for their wrongdoing, and it was kind of sad when we had to put him down. Then he became a pro-wrestler, and he was even a little heroic (sort of like an angry drunk belittling you but also giving you good advice). Now he’s like a dark mirror showing us where we are today, but it’s from the perspective of the gods, so neither of us can understand what the other is trying to say, but the atrocities and works of art that result from our attempts at communication make for an interesting story all the same.